Author Topic: Terminology  (Read 7036 times)

Mike Gilbert

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Terminology
« on: June 30, 2014, 10:04:56 AM »

Here is a link to a short article by Tom Roebuck, a highly respected breeder and poultry judge from Virginia.
It is worth reading whether you agree with him or not.

http://showbirdbid.proboards.com/thread/7192/poultry-terminology-social-media

Lee G

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2014, 12:03:36 PM »
Good article! Thank you for sharing it.

My thoughts are this: learning to use the correct terminology only makes sense, especially if you want to be taken seriously...

And Ralph Sturgeon's 'Start Where You Are With What You Have' is a wonderful little gem of a booklet. I encourage anyone with an interest in breeding chickens to find and purchase a copy.

Best $20 I spent in awhile.  :)
~ The duty of the breeder today and tomorrow is to create rather than imitate or simply perpetuate -- Horace Dryden

Beth C

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2014, 09:41:45 AM »
Ralph Sturgeon's 'Start Where You Are With What You Have' is a wonderful little gem of a booklet. I encourage anyone with an interest in breeding chickens to find and purchase a copy.

Best $20 I spent in awhile.  :)

I'll second that! The only place I know of to purchase it is Poultry NZ. Ian is wonderful and ships very quickly in spite of the distance.

SkiBuny

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2014, 03:51:26 PM »
Thank you Jon, very useful information!

Thank you too Lee, I will get that book since I am getting serious about my breeding!

:-)

John

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2014, 12:55:45 PM »
AOV seems to be an abbreviation and
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 06:11:44 PM by Resigned »

Max

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2014, 04:06:10 PM »

For our club AOV has historically meant to mean any variety that isn't one of the recognized varieties.  With, black, blue, blue wheaten, brown red, buff, silver, wheaten and white being the only varieties that are recognized/accepted by the APA/ABA, lavender, splash, black gold, chocolate and All Other Varieties are considered AOV, by us, at our sanctioned meets.


This is how I have always viewed it and I think it should be this way for all breeds. It seems less confusing to me this way. I have read some pretty heated arguments on other forums about this subject. AOV means that if there were large fowl lavender, splash, black gold, and chocolate Ameraucana entered in the same show, they would all be competing against each other for Best AOV...  Correct?
Max Strawn

Mike Gilbert

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2014, 04:31:09 PM »
That's right Max.   And you could throw splash wheaten into that mix too.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2014, 06:58:45 PM by John Blehm »

John

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2014, 06:58:09 PM »
I know members are also working on partridge, red pyle, blue silver, mottled...

(Sorry Mike,  I meant to reply to your post and ended up modifying it somehow) :o

John

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2014, 03:54:11 PM »
We use "Best" when describing the Best
« Last Edit: February 23, 2015, 06:12:04 PM by Resigned »

Cesar “CJ”

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2015, 10:04:43 PM »
I read the article by Tom Roebuck

I like to say "roo" it sounds cool to me. I might start using it more often. Lets face it is the 21st century I think we can add another term. I think we all know what people are trying to say when we hear "roo" and "young roo" etc.. 

Don

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Re: Terminology
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2020, 12:34:41 PM »
The original link is no longer available. Maybe someone can locate another article for this topic.

Shows should be sanctioned by the ABA American Bantam Association and the APA American Poultry association. This allows the exhibitors to attain points for applicable wins at the sanctioned shows. Judges are normally licensed by one or both of these organizations as well. Some licenses are specific to one species, IE some judges have not attained Water fowl qualifications.....

Ameraucanas are accepted by both organizations in the 8 varieties in LF and bantam, ABA bantam only. All other Varieties (colors) are considered AOV.  This applies to Project Colors such as Splash Wheaten, Mottled, Barred and Columbian as well as Colors that may be in the process or being considered for acceptance such as Self Blue and Splash. AOV's can only compete to the level of Best of Variety or Best AOV. They can not compete against the accepted varieties for BB, Best of Breed, or RB, Reserve of Breed. 

Trios can be entered at many shows. A trio must be One Cock or Cockerel and Two Hens or Pullets, all in one Variety. The pullets must be identical as they are to balance the Male in breeding traits. 

A Display is One trio and 4 other birds of the same variety. They should include at least one C, H, k, p.  Both the ABA and the APA have calculations for ranking the Best Displays.

BB Best of Breed
RB Reserve of Breed
Best AOV, Best of any other varieties, unaccepted varieties
BV, Best of Variety
RV, Reserve of Variety

AOSB, Any other Standard Breed - APA LF
AOCCL, Any other Comb Clean Legged, Bantams

C - Cock, male over one year old
k - Cockerel, male under one year
H - Hen, female over on year old
p - Pullet, female less than a year old

Variety - an color pattern of poultry. This applies to accepted as well as other Standard Colors. Not all colors are active in the ABA and APA Standards. One such color is Splash Wheaten. This color standard is available by contacting the Secretaries of the ABA and APA.

Double Mating is sometimes used when a variety produces better males or females using breeding stock that may not produce the best colored birds of both varieties. Some feel that Silvers are one of these varieties.






« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 04:23:02 PM by Don »
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