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Author Topic: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity  (Read 614 times)

Max

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A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« on: August 24, 2017, 08:12:42 AM »
I have always considered myself a conscious observer and enforcer of good biosecurity practices on my property. About six weeks ago, I had a lapse in judgement and let my guard down. As a result, my birds have been infected with Laryngotracheitis (ILT) and the Texas Animal Health Commission will be depopulating most of my flock. Fortunately, they are willing to work with me to save my bloodlines and the hard work I have put into them. I will be quarantined and allowed to keep only a select few birds for breeding purposes. As soon as I have enough chicks, the remaining breeders will be depopulated.

To protect everyone and to prevent the possibility of spreading the virus, I will not be entering or visiting any poultry shows this year. As much as I would like to see and visit with my poultry friends, I feel like this is the right thing to do.

If you have been fortunate enough to avoid a devastating disease outbreak within your flock, don’t take it for granted and don’t let your guard down. It only takes one person, one bird, one touch or one step in the wrong spot to spread disease. If you are unfamiliar with good biosecurity practices, I encourage you to research and learn all you can. One day, it may prevent you from losing your flock.

If you show or plan to show, vaccinate and follow good quarantine practices when you return home. It could save your flock as well.

After this, I don’t know that I will ever let another poultry related person enter the yard. I suppose with proper biosecurity measures it would be ok, but at this point I’m not willing to risk it.

On a more positive note, I have the opportunity to start fresh and eliminate any other diseases that may be present including those that are carried through the egg such as MG. I don’t know how long it will last but at least I know where I am starting from.

Click the link below and scroll to page 9.

https://books.google.com/books?id=PJ7XFY86HOQC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Max Strawn

Don

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2017, 08:38:51 AM »
Max,   I am very sorry to hear this and I know that you are making some really hard decisions right now.  I am glad that you have the option of working with the Texas Ag folks to keep your lines for hatching.  I hope that makes things work for you in the next few seasons too.  Also sorry to hear that you won't be able to participate in the shows this fall.  You and your birds will be missed for sure.  Good luck with your hatching and I hope that you have tremendous success with this new generation.
Don Cash
" No word was ever as effective as a rightly timed pause."  Mark Twain

Susan Mouw

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2017, 10:28:24 AM »
Oh my, Max.  That had to be devastating.  I'm glad, though, that the Texas Ag Dept is working with you to let you keep  your bloodlines.

I know you'll be missed at all the Fall shows this year and I hope you're back out there next year!
Susan Mouw
Sand Castles Farm
http://www.sandcastlesfarm.com

Birdcrazy

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2017, 11:06:35 AM »
Max, So sorry to hear of your situation. Right now, I'm sure you feel devastated and rightfully so. I'm glad the Texas Animal Health Commission is working with you to help save all of the years of your breeding program and bloodlines. Right now it probably seems like a long road back, but at least it is a path to restore your bloodlines. You will be missed at the shows as well as your birds. Get those eggs hatched and a fresh start and back on the circuit. You showed you have the ability to raise and show great birds, so we know you will be back. Your loss is our loss also for now, and we can't wait until you are back. Don Cash and myself have been dealing with predators, but that seems like nothing compared to what you are going through. Keep your head up!
Gordon Gilliam

Paul

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2017, 01:49:28 PM »
Max,
 
  We are sorry to hear the bad news.  We know how devastating this can be as we went through the same thing in Jan. 2004.  The TAHC also worked with us to keep the flock for 2 weeks so we could save their eggs to repopulate thus saving our genetics.

  Dickey Richardson, the TAHC worker who depopulated our flock told me that if we had vaccinated for "LT" that this wouldn't be happening.  I tried for many years to get fanciers to vaccinate and only managed to persuade very few to do it.  We recently completed our second dose of LT vaccinations so our entire flock is safe for another year.  It is a big job to vaccinate 578 head, but it is worth the effort and expense.

  We used our experience with "LT" to learn a vaccination program.  I use to think "why vaccinate unless you have a problem?"  The answer is to prevent having a problem!

  The TAHC will not allow a flock with "LT" to continue to operate and spread the virus in Texas.  They want to keep it out of Texas so the huge commercial flocks don't have to vaccinate for it.  Pennsylvania and Georgia use to require show birds to be vaccinated for "LT" before they could be shown.  That was 13 years ago, I don't know if they still do require it now.  This reveals the extremes from different areas of the US concerning "LT".

  Even as difficult as this is, you can get past it and have a fresh new start and still save your bloodlines!  We will look forward to showing with you next year.  You and Tawnya will be missed at the 2017 fall shows.

  Best wishes,

  Paul & Angela Smith
Paul Smith

Lindsay Helton

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2017, 11:29:16 PM »
I am sorry to hear this Max. I am sure that your presence will be missed at the fall and winter shows. Due to NPIP precautions and biosecurity measures in place, I no longer offer tours of our farm to the public. There were several AI scares in nearby counties last year. Best of luck to you, and we will look forward to seeing you rebound from this.
-Lindsay

"If you continuously compete with others, you become bitter, but if you continuously compete with yourself, you become better."

Max

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2017, 08:30:19 AM »
Thanks everyone for your support. It's not the end of the world. It's just extremely inconvenient. It does however, give me the opportunity to make some improvements to my setup. It's hard to move pens when they are all full of birds. I plan to install an automatic watering system. Getting tired of hauling water every day...
Max Strawn

Don

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Re: A Hard Lesson on Biosecurity
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2017, 02:46:00 PM »
Max,  I am glad you able to maintain a Good Attitude toward this whole situation.  I am not sure I could have handled it quite so well.  I applaud you for that.  I know it has not been easy and sure that it has been a roller coaster of emotions.  A fresh start always presents new opportunity for sure.  And you seeing it as such will present you with a chance to implement what you've learned these past few years.

I would be interested in hearing what new perspective and changes as you go about breeding anew.  And I would be most interested in what you learn and decide to include in your new vaccination process.  I know Paul has worked on this for many seasons and am sure he can provide all of us with a leg up on this process.  Anything that you learn and care to share will help others as they decide how to plan a program for their own flocks in the future.   
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 03:46:26 PM by Don »
Don Cash
" No word was ever as effective as a rightly timed pause."  Mark Twain