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Silver Leghorn male:

Hackle- Silvery white with a narrow dull black stripe extending down middle of each lower hackle feather, tapering to a point near its lower extremity.

Saddle- Silvery white.

Silver Ameraucana male (and also Silver Dutch male):

Hackle- Silvery white, a dull black stripe, free from shafting, extending down middle of each lower hackle feather, tapering to a point just short of lower extremity, the black stripe increasing in intensity and brilliance to a lustrous greenish black at the lower extremity.

Saddle- Same as hackle, but with less striping than hackle.

The current plumage description for the hackle and saddle is clearly reflected in the portraits of the Silver Ameraucana male and the Silver Dutch male in the APA SOP book.

In the ABA SOP book, the plumage description for the hackle and saddle also makes mention of the black stripe increasing in intensity and brilliance to a lustrous greenish black, therefore our ABA and APA plumage descriptions would no longer match regarding the hackle and saddle.
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News and Information / Re: Silver Ameraucana Color Variety Plumage Description
« Last post by Jean on July 02, 2020, 04:10:04 PM »
We do not know if the APA is considering changing all the silver breed descriptions or for some reason just picked ours.  But if we consider all the breeds with the "silver" color here are some findings I sent to the Board that Lindsay and I worked on:

Just wanted to let you know Lindsay and I put our heads together while on the phone.  We researched all the silver birds in the APA standard.

We found that there are two different silver descriptions used.  One with clean hackles and saddles and one with striping in the hackles and saddles.  While doing the research, we found all of these varieties do have photos in the standard and reflect this small difference.

The birds that are clean are the silver leghorn, silver leghorn bantam, araucana and american game bantam.  The birds that have striping are the ameraucana, ameraucana bantam, silver dutch, silver phoenix and silver phoenix bantam.

If the APA wants to change to the silver leghorn description for all silver varieties, the five other breeds will have to change the way they breed their birds and will also have to change their picture in the standard.  This could mean some breeds would not meet the standard for years.  I also do not feel it should fall to the breed clubs or portrait sponsors to pay for these changes.

I would say no to them on changing it.  The only option Lindsay and I could think of was to add a memo to the standard that the above breeds do allow striping in the saddle and hackles if they want to use one description for the silver color variety.


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Ameraucana Marketplace / Re: Silver Standard Description
« Last post by Don on July 01, 2020, 11:59:24 PM »
This is the discussion between club members and Sam Brush before the Silver Standard Description was changed.  Maybe it can shed some background on why the Dutch color was selected over the Leghorn Silver. I don't know if Sam or any of the others involved might add some light as well.  There are color renderings of the Silver AM Large Fowl in the APA Standard that might help also.   
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The APA Standard Committee has contacted us to ask about the language for the Silver Ameraucana color variety. They are currently working on the next edition of the Standard of Perfection book. The Silver Ameraucana color variety currently refers to the Silver Dutch for the plumage description. They have asked for our thoughts on referring to the Silver Leghorn for the plumage description instead. They are trying to condense the references used in the SOP in order to make the SOP easier to read. They would like to list the color descriptions in the front of the SOP.

If any of our members have thoughts regarding this, please contact us via email at abcsecretaryhelton@gmail.com.
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News and Information / Re: APA Education and Training website
« Last post by Lindsay Helton on July 01, 2020, 12:14:35 AM »
Thanks Gordon! I hope your computer gets fixed quickly.
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News and Information / Re: APA Education and Training website
« Last post by Birdcrazy on June 30, 2020, 08:08:45 PM »
Wow! Nice looking ad and the pictures really popped out! That was viewing with my smart phone. My computer went down Sunday evening and is in the shop hopefully for repair. I can’t wait until I get it back so I can view the ad full page without scrolling Right and left and up and down.
 Keep up the good work Lindsay !!!!!!
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News and Information / APA Education and Training website
« Last post by Lindsay Helton on June 30, 2020, 07:08:21 PM »
The American Poultry Association has created an education and training website. Very exciting!

I created an advertisement for the Ameraucana breed and the club using the information from our current club flyer and Poultry Press advertisement as well as photos of bantam and large fowl Ameraucanas.

The advertisement can be viewed here:

https://secureservercdn.net/45.40.155.175/p12.3df.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/ABCFlyer2020-1.pdf
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Breeding / Re: Keep or Cull?
« Last post by Lindsay Helton on June 25, 2020, 08:03:10 PM »
Nice article Lindsay. I enjoyed reading and looking at the photos. Hopefully this will be a learning tool for myself and others interested in promoting and furthering the rise of the Ameraucana Breed. Thank you!

Thanks Gordon!
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Breeding / Re: Keep or Cull?
« Last post by Birdcrazy on June 25, 2020, 01:34:52 PM »
Nice article Lindsay. I enjoyed reading and looking at the photos. Hopefully this will be a learning tool for myself and others interested in promoting and furthering the rise of the Ameraucana Breed. Thank you!
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Breeding / Keep or Cull?
« Last post by Lindsay Helton on June 25, 2020, 11:57:34 AM »
Keep or cull?

An important task when breeding towards the standard is to narrow down your birds each season. Breeders that have a good line of birds and breed towards the standard hope for roughly 50% of chicks that are produced to be breeding quality and 10-25% to be show quality. Many breeders will only keep the show quality birds to put in their breeding pens the following year.

I have attached a picture of “keepers and culls” from a reputable breeding program to signify the importance of narrowing down your birds each season if you want to breed towards the standard. Remember to select for quality over quantity when selecting breeding stock and setting up your breeding pens.

A breeder has taken the time to share their comments on each bird below. A special thank you to that breeder. 

Keep in mind that a bird that is considered a cull in one breeding program may be considered a keeper in another breeding program depending on the state of that breeding program.

A - Splash pullet - definitely a keeper. While the color standard is yet to be accepted for Splash, the type on this bird, overall, is very nice. Although we can't really see her breast outline very well, because of the other bird's tail, the beginning (top) of that breast looks like there is a nice curve there. Full muffs and beard, good skin color (look at the beak). Hard to tell from this pic, but her tail might be a bit pinched, but I would need to see it from the back to know for sure.

B - Blue Wheaten cockerel - definitely a cull. Let's start with the overall body type. First, that tail set is too high, he has some significant black striping in his hackles, his beard and muff look to be single-gened. I can't tell much about his comb, but I like a nice tight pea comb and his looks to be a bit high - especially for a bird this young - his full tail feathers aren't even in yet.

C - Black pullet - absolutely a keeper! Even from this angle, you can see the roundness of the breast, the overall substance in the body, and the balance. A beautiful length of back with a very nice transition into that perfect 40 degree tail set (Remember - 40 deg. for hens, 45 for cockbirds). There might be a bit of excessive fluff back there, but I wouldn't toss this bird for that, when everything else is so nicely tied together.

D - Black pullet - I actually could go either way on this bird, depending on where I was in my breeding program. I'd like to see a bit more breast, a bit shorter back, and nicer transition from neck to back. Of course, if I had to choose between this pullet and Pullet C - it would be Pullet C, hands down.

E - Blue pullet - definitely a keeper. I can't fault this bird for type - that tail will come up and she probably matured very nicely. The transition from neck into back is already there, the balance is there, substance is there. The blue color looks a bit splotchy in places, but that could molt out and nothing to be overly concerned with at this age. Very nice lacing overall, too. Nicely defined lobes in those muffs and beard, too. Overall, a nice pullet.

F - Blue pullet - definitely a cull. Poor balance, lack of substance, lack of breast, and that tail set is already too high. Add to that the color issue with lack of lacing, and this bird is out of here!

G - Blue cockerel - nice! He's apparently young, as that tail hasn't come up all the way yet, but I would bet that he ended up with a very nice tail set. Good substance overall, good balance, and look at the fullness in that breast! That comb is a bit high for my tastes, but I would just make sure he is bred to hens with nice tight combs. Full muffs and beard, though not as well defined as F above, but he's young yet. On color - very nice! You can just see the beginning of the breast and the lacing there above his hocks, but this bird is a keeper.

H - Blue pullet - another one I could go either way on, depending on where I was in my breeding program. Overall type is actually decent with good substance, proper tail set, good transition from neck to back to tail. Can't tell anything about her muffs and beard in this pick, except for that one area on the cheeks, but it looks fairly full. Tail might be pinched - again, hard to tell from this angle. The biggest issue I would have with this bird is the almost complete lack of lacing - but, again, if I needed to set that type in my breeding program, I wouldn't throw her out just for the lacing issue - especially if I had a male like G to breed her to.

I - Black cockerel - definitely a keeper, but out of condition. That tail isn't fully in yet, but I like the transition from neck to back to tail. Decent breast and substance. Nicely balanced. Again with the comb - I like a nice, tight comb, but I could work with that.

J - Black cockerel -Completely lacking in substance overall, back too long - this is just not a good example of type for an Ameraucana. He'd have to go.
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