Author Topic: NPIP certification is it worth it  (Read 34141 times)

Jean

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #15 on: March 09, 2012, 05:23:26 PM »
Kim,

What are they charging you $50.00 per year for?  The test is a yearly test.

If you do decide to get certified, I would recommend getting the AI testing done also on a quarterly basis.  This puts you in the AI free category which most State require when shipping in and to get those permits.  It also provides coverage should there be an outbreak of AI and the come to \"cull\" your flock.  You will get $$$ to replace your flock.
Jean

mustangsaguaro

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2012, 06:41:56 PM »
Quote from: Jean


Entry permits before shipping:

Alaska
Connecticut
Illinois
Kansas
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Texas



Are these entry permits for live birds or eggs too? I know Texas is pretty strict.

Jean

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2012, 07:52:37 PM »
New Hampshire is for started birds.  RI, the purchaser must get permit and Texas is for all hatching eggs and birds.  You must also get a CVI for started birds in TX.

All the rest are for everything entering.
Jean

mustangsaguaro

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2012, 01:17:24 PM »
Quote from: Jean
Kim,

What are they charging you $50.00 per year for?  The test is a yearly test.

If you do decide to get certified, I would recommend getting the AI testing done also on a quarterly basis.  This puts you in the AI free category which most State require when shipping in and to get those permits.  It also provides coverage should there be an outbreak of AI and the come to \"cull\" your flock.  You will get $$$ to replace your flock.


Actually it is $100/yr. $50 twice a year. When I called to get info last year about this the lady was very nice and helpful. And sent me a packet in the mail which I still have. They test for obviously pullorum/typhoid and AI. Those blood tests are actually free of charge as the state has a grant for the blood tests. But to actually get the NPIP cert. I guess once the test are done the state vet or an inspector comes out and inspects your facility to make sure everything is up to par. I guess that\'s what the $100/yr is. Perhaps I should give them a call or email tomorrow and find out exactly what the $100 entails.

Remember I am in Ca. and they get you for every little thing out here. THe state needs the money. And I guess that\'s one way to get money the state needs.

Jean

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2012, 01:59:41 PM »
My State charges $85.00 an hour from the time the vet leaves the facility he works out of. This is over two hours away from me.  They also are charging a per diem....
 
I get around this charge by having my site inspection (which is a once a year thing, not twice) by having it done when the vet is doing the AI testing.  All of the charges associated with the AI program should be included in the Federal funding.

I argued and fought with the State when they first started charging by the hour and now they let me use a vet tech from my veterinarians office to pull blood and I send it in to the State Lab for the pullorum tests.  They didn\'t want me to quit the program.

Jean

HarryS

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2012, 03:04:28 PM »
In the 1970\'s the state technician use to come to your property  and do the birds for free.  I still have one of my old NPIP certificates.  Here in Pa they still have a state program plus there is the NPIP federal program which ever one prefers but they try and talk you into doing the NPIP program.
Harry Shaffer

mustangsaguaro

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #21 on: March 12, 2012, 06:49:00 PM »
Quote from: Jean
Kim,

What are they charging you $50.00 per year for?  The test is a yearly test.

If you do decide to get certified, I would recommend getting the AI testing done also on a quarterly basis.  This puts you in the AI free category which most State require when shipping in and to get those permits.  It also provides coverage should there be an outbreak of AI and the come to \"cull\" your flock.  You will get $$$ to replace your flock.


Jean,

I contacted the person in my state that does the testing and what not. I had some questions for her and to see if things had changed since last year. Here are her answers. Perhaps the question you asked of what they are charging me for is answered.

Hi Kim

Thanks for getting back to me with questions… nothing has changed since we first communicated, but I will clear up a few things for you…

 

1.       While the small flock program is in effect, you do not pay for someone to draw the blood samples, nor do you pay the lab fees. The CA Poultry Health Board (me) pays for both while I have funding for the program. The “state” isn’t paying the fees, the CPHB is paying the fees. If I lose my USDA funding for Avian Influenza monitoring, then the flockowner would be responsible for both these expenses. We will be testing for Pullorum Typhoid and Avian Influenza.

2.       $50 is payable when you send in your application form to me. I hold on to the check until the blood work is complete and then deposit it once the flock inspection is done. This fee is then billed April 1 of each year as the Annual Fee.  The $50 flock certification fee is paid after you have completed the steps to join and receive your official NPIP member number.  You will receive a VS 9-2 when your flock is certified, and an invoice for the flock certification fee will be attached. So, these 2 fees are billed at different times, I do not collect $100 up front to cover the year.  But, each year it will cost you a total of $100 to maintain membership.

3.       If all of your breeder birds are purchased from NPIP primary breeders, we will only test for PT when joining initially. But, if you continue to breed your birds and their progeny, you will be considered a primary breeder and we will test once a year for PT  and 2x a year for Avian Influenza (AI). So, PT and AI will be tested at the same time and approximately 180 days later we will come back and test just for AI.

4.       A CA Dept of Food and Agriculture veterinarian will do the flock inspection upon joining. This is a one-time event…. They do not inspect every year.

5.       My budget only allows me to send a tech out one time to do the blood draws when joining… so if you want all your birds to be certified, then we need to wait until they all are over 16 weeks, which sounds like it might be late summer/early fall. I cannot send someone out now to test birds of age, and then again in a couple of months to test the remaining birds as they become the right age. You will need to wait until the entire flock is over 16 weeks.

6.       Once we start, the process could take 1-3 months to complete. Reasons for that are: if you have positive reactors to the blood tests, those birds need to be quarantined and we test again 30 days from the original test date; the CDFA fits us in for inspections, so I am reliant on their schedule and when they can get the time to do it.

OldChurchEggery

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #22 on: March 13, 2012, 10:37:39 AM »
Oh, Virginia. I was thinking about getting NPIP certified but like others have mentioned, selling locally sort of avoids the need for it. I\'m in the Virginia Poultry Breeders Assoc. and we have a hard time getting out-of-state entrants at shows because Virginia is so strict. The strange thing is that the Post Office doesn\'t seem to enforce the entry requirements as I have heard on other forums of people in Virginia getting shipped eggs that didn\'t have entry papers even though the box was marked as eggs. Maybe they thought they were decorated Easter Eggs (pysanky)?

Jean

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #23 on: March 13, 2012, 03:13:23 PM »
Quote from: mustangsaguaro
Quote from: Jean
Kim,

What are they charging you $50.00 per year for?  The test is a yearly test.

If you do decide to get certified, I would recommend getting the AI testing done also on a quarterly basis.  This puts you in the AI free category which most State require when shipping in and to get those permits.  It also provides coverage should there be an outbreak of AI and the come to \"cull\" your flock.  You will get $$$ to replace your flock.


Jean,

I contacted the person in my state that does the testing and what not. I had some questions for her and to see if things had changed since last year. Here are her answers. Perhaps the question you asked of what they are charging me for is answered.

Hi Kim

Thanks for getting back to me with questions… nothing has changed since we first communicated, but I will clear up a few things for you…

 

1.       While the small flock program is in effect, you do not pay for someone to draw the blood samples, nor do you pay the lab fees. The CA Poultry Health Board (me) pays for both while I have funding for the program. The “state” isn’t paying the fees, the CPHB is paying the fees. If I lose my USDA funding for Avian Influenza monitoring, then the flockowner would be responsible for both these expenses. We will be testing for Pullorum Typhoid and Avian Influenza.

2.       $50 is payable when you send in your application form to me. I hold on to the check until the blood work is complete and then deposit it once the flock inspection is done. This fee is then billed April 1 of each year as the Annual Fee.  The $50 flock certification fee is paid after you have completed the steps to join and receive your official NPIP member number.  You will receive a VS 9-2 when your flock is certified, and an invoice for the flock certification fee will be attached. So, these 2 fees are billed at different times, I do not collect $100 up front to cover the year.  But, each year it will cost you a total of $100 to maintain membership.

3.       If all of your breeder birds are purchased from NPIP primary breeders, we will only test for PT when joining initially. But, if you continue to breed your birds and their progeny, you will be considered a primary breeder and we will test once a year for PT  and 2x a year for Avian Influenza (AI). So, PT and AI will be tested at the same time and approximately 180 days later we will come back and test just for AI.

4.       A CA Dept of Food and Agriculture veterinarian will do the flock inspection upon joining. This is a one-time event…. They do not inspect every year.

5.       My budget only allows me to send a tech out one time to do the blood draws when joining… so if you want all your birds to be certified, then we need to wait until they all are over 16 weeks, which sounds like it might be late summer/early fall. I cannot send someone out now to test birds of age, and then again in a couple of months to test the remaining birds as they become the right age. You will need to wait until the entire flock is over 16 weeks.

6.       Once we start, the process could take 1-3 months to complete. Reasons for that are: if you have positive reactors to the blood tests, those birds need to be quarantined and we test again 30 days from the original test date; the CDFA fits us in for inspections, so I am reliant on their schedule and when they can get the time to do it.


Annual fee for what costs?  She just said she is funded by the Feds.  If they only do you AI twice a year, you are not considered AI clean.

You are supposed to be inspected every year.  It\'s in the Federal guidelines.

Now I know why people in your State are not certified....
Jean

Christie Rhae

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NPIP certification is it worth it
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2012, 07:40:43 PM »
Well I had in interesting conversation today with a poultry vet.  He is the only vet on this island that deals with chickens.  Apparently he was very active in getting \"newcastle\" under control in California.

Anyway, I wanted to know what else I should be doing with my chickens besides worming, controlling mites, balance nutrition, etc.  I told him I had heard all kinds of terrible stories about Mareks disease.  He said that he had never come across a case of mareks or newcastle disease here on the Big Island.  I told him that my birds are exposed to wild birds all the time (doves always get caught in my coops).  

Apparently he does not think I need to vaccinate my birds.

I also asked about the NPIP thing with Hawaii.  I mentioned how I cannot get birds without NPIP from the mainland but this state does not participate so how could I ever ship birds out?  (not that I see any need to be able to ship birds out in the next millennium)  But he was aware of the typical double standard Hawaii has and assured me that if there was ever a need for me to ship birds out he would find out what I needed and help me out.  

He seemed like a very informative and helpful vet.  I am glad I made contact, in case a situation ever arrises that I need vet assistance.  One never knows.